Category: architecture

March 6, 2017

I saw the sign (But I nearly missed it)

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Look close, or you’ll miss it. Camouflaged like legitimate street signs in public spaces,  you’ll find these fun urban interventions in and around Sydney. Created by artist Michael Pederson (aka Miguel Marquez Outside) these mini signs are bound to grab your attention. A park solitude rating guide, oversized emergency panic buttons, or personal space preference cards, all completely ludicrous and yet it’s hard not to think these might be useful in certain situations.

 

Scroll down for a selection of the signs or you can see more of Pederson’s work on Instagram.

 

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February 20, 2017

A view of the Top

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AirPano is a not-for-profit project created by a team of Russian photo enthusiasts focused on taking high-resolution aerial panoramic photographs. Being the largest resource for 360° aerial panoramas in the world – by geographical coverage, number of aerial photographs, and artistic and technical quality of the images, AirPano has already photographed over two hundred most interesting locations on our planet, including North Pole, Antarctica, Mariana Trench, and even the Earth’s view from the stratosphere. The team consists of 12 members, nine photographers and three tech specialists, who use planes, helicopters and drones to shoot from high above. The company started back in 2006.

 

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January 31, 2017

Katie & Joe.

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Katie and Joe are a husband and wife photography team who have mastered minimalism. Their photographs are filled with a generous honesty. The couple are currently based in Portland, Oregon. Their work can be found in magazines such as Liner, Atlas, Material Girl, Zeum, and Cake.

We love the striking gazes, the subtleties and the muted tones they are able to capture with their lenses. Check out this beautiful couple’s work at www.katieandjoe.co


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January 26, 2017

P H A N T A S M A

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Carla de la Matta from New York City and Loïc Remy from Paris, have joined efforts in an ongoing collaboration that transcends borders and connects  “the city that doesn’t sleep” and “the city of light”. Together, they have created a series they titled “Phantasma”. Their unusual creative ideas and photographic visions gave birth to an original project that bridges two continents and defies photographic norms. “Phantasma” is a series of photographs that combines images of New York and Paris. Both cities share many similarities and are unique at the same time, but this is not about getting a result with speech photos or sense, it is more about forms and feelings.
This series meets through the Atlantic Ocean, where Paris has always existed in her mind as New York has existed in his. A vision very close to a fantasy or a “fantasma”, which in Spanish means GHOST.

The Louvre & WTC NYC
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

The Louvre Museum & Washington Square Arch
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

WTC NYC & Montparnasse Paris
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

Eiffel Tower & Manhattan Bridge
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

Pacific Tower by Kurokawa – La Défense & Trump International Hotel and Tower – NY
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

Paris Left & NYC Right
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

NYC Left & Paris Right
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

The Granite Tower – La Défense, Paris & WTC NYC
“Phantasma”
© Carla DLM & © Loïc Remy

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January 24, 2017

Broken items or just an opportunity to get creative?

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Resourcefulness at its best, here are a few images of people who did not let the happenings in life get them down. These people turned a bad situation into an incredibly beautiful one by using a cheaper yet creative method to fix their damaged items. Next time something you own is damaged, use it as an opportunity rather than a set back!

 

As Berne Brown said ‘There is no innovation and creativity without failure”

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January 12, 2017

la línea roja’

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‘la línea roja’ — a visual study of geometry and form in dialogue with nature. 

Nicolas Rivals, a photographer based in Paris, installed luminous, neon-hued squares, triangles and intersecting lines across scenic landscapes in Spain. He’s described this particular installation as “a red line woven over a journey through Spain, to connect Man with nature. A red line to fix a moment of poetry, the time of a night. Unreal scenes that nevertheless existed to better disappear in the morning. An installation deposited as a proposition to the natural world. A luminous harmony between will and chance. Between homage and sacrilege. Between the beautiful and the strange. An aesthetic research around forms dialoguing with a nature indifferent to symmetry.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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January 11, 2017

Utopian Dwelling


We have gone from mud brick houses to homes built out of wood and stone to concrete and steel. Limited space has become an increasingly critical issue. With affordability, convenience, practicality coming into play, we often forget about the kind of homes we desire.

Jing Zhang has taken ideas from childhood and developed types of homes that could only exist in utopia, and has conveyed them using simple, beautiful and brightly coloured illustrations.

 

 

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December 1, 2016

We Are Flowers, Melissa

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A stunning, nature-inspired installation of over 20,000 translucent flowers to create a large immersive hanging surface in the New York flagship. The surface was designed specifically for the Melissa Gallery in New York with an engineered Mylar net made of over 4,000 unique pieces. These flowers are placed in a more natural arrangement to combine the flowers and structural surface in a way that resembles a natural canopy of flowers. This canopy hangs down into the gallery at specific places to make the installation much more immersive and spatial. It has been described as a design that expresses sensuality through its form and brings joy and colour to the Melissa experience.

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November 22, 2016

Whimsicle forrest flip books

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Books have evolved consistently over time. First, it was your standard paperback, then we had pop-up books, and more recently, the shift to e-books and tablet reading.

That shift is understandable given the digitisation of society. It’s an innovation that we all saw coming, but interactive books the size of humans – that’s a whole other story.

But, that story has now come to life courtesy of London-based Mobile Studio Architects.

The architect studio recently collaborated with students at a US summer camp to create some truly magical oversized flip-books that depict fictional forest tales.

The oversized books are electromechanical display devices, which are electronic devices that visualise alphanumerical text and fixed graphics. These particular books use split-flip display technology that is utilised in airports and train stations to show departure times.

Each installation contains a total of 50 drawings which were designed by the students themselves. “With more than 500 still images traced and colours painstakingly applied by hand, the campers brought to life five animations of avian behaviour inspired by the incredible forest setting,” Mobile Studio Architects said.

With several of the interactive machines hidden throughout the forest, users are encouraged to explore their surroundings through prompted stimuli. It’s kind of like Dora the Explorer on steroids, without swiper swiping everything.

The pages of the books are protected within rectangular metal frames and are fitted with rotating mechanisms powered by handles on the side.

While all of this is cool, it quite literally pales in comparison to perhaps the most awesome aspect of this design. All frames are constructed with built-in LED lights, which means the giant flipbooks can be used at night.

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September 6, 2016

Loose lips recycles Ships

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In Seoul, there’s a unique pavilion that looks oddly out of place. It’s only once you turn upside-down that you’ll realise what it really is: a rusty old ship.

While most ships go to die in a scrapyard where they’re cut up and sold off, Shinslab Architecture gave this vessel a second chance at life. They basically took its hull, flipped it, and turned its interiors into a beautiful and modern pavilion.

It’s a great example of recycling done right, and it also gets visitors to lament on our culture of waste. The building eventually won this year’s Moma Young Architects Program.

You can find out more about Shinslab Architecture by heading over here.in-south-korea-a-rusty-ship-is-given-new-life-as-a-beautiful-pavilion3-3-805x575 in-south-korea-a-rusty-ship-is-given-new-life-as-a-beautiful-pavilion4-2-805x575 in-south-korea-a-rusty-ship-is-given-new-life-as-a-beautiful-pavilion5-805x575 in-south-korea-a-rusty-ship-is-given-new-life-as-a-beautiful-pavilion7-805x527 in-south-korea-a-rusty-ship-is-given-new-life-as-a-beautiful-pavilion8-805x575 in-south-korea-a-rusty-ship-is-given-new-life-as-a-beautiful-pavilion9-805x575

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