Nice Tips: Valuable skills every designer should learn

The new year is a great time to step up your design skills.  There so many tools and skills that you need to master, and missing out on any of them would also mean missing out on a lot of huge opportunities.

So if you’re ready to take your career in design a step further, grab your clipboard and start making a checklist containing these essential skills that you should learn:

  1. HTML and CSS
  2. Typography
  3. Colour Theory
  4. Print Design
  5. Photography
  6. Design Software
  7. Networking
  8. Marketing and Social Media
  9. Copywriting
  10. Creativity

Check out the full list here

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Education and design

Graphic design of the program of season of MJC Villeurbanne.
The “Maisons des jeunes et de la culture” or MJC are leisure clubs run in part by local authorities. They offer all sorts of activities, some more specifically for youngsters (sports, music, art) and some for adults
(keep fit, folk dancing, pottery, photography etc) ; their mission is to develop citizenship through education and culture.

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great brands are communicated, not designed

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Utter Otter Artistry

If this doesn’t make your Monday a brighter day, then I don’t know what will, nor do I know whether we could ever be friends.

Take a look, and be romanced by these delicate illustrations done by 星明 李 . Bringing a character to life is an art, and as we see here, can be projected thoroughly exuding the effect of emotion, mannerism, personality by simply putting pencil to paper. His spatial understanding and soft technique creates artwork that is detailed and refined, yet warm and playful. I am a fan, and I hope you are too.

 

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Happy Monday, everyone. May your week continue to be fuzzy, friendly and top-class (much like our Otter friend here).

Jump into the wonders of visual storytelling and explore a world of sensory emotions. Great design communicates – what do you have to say?

great brands are communicated, not designed

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Branding and People

The Saint Etienne Opera House commissioned Brand designer Graphéine to redesign the Opera House visual identity. The redesign had us singing from the roof tops in awe of their clever and simple visual communication.
The objective stated was to restore a sense of closeness with citizens of Saint-Étienne, through a simple and popular communication. The main innovation was the abandonment of the name “Opera Theatre” in favour of “Opera of Saint-Etienne” to reflect an opera house image with its historic public, but also potential audiences.

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Looking for a clever yet simple communication, follow the link to see how:

great brands are communicated, not designed

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Why not engRoss yourself?

Have you ever thought of exactly what ingredients are needed to compose the perfect creative director? I am not sure that the perfect recipe has been unveiled, but whatever the it entails, this man certainly cracks the nod. Have a look at Design Fest to take note of the secrets, formulas and measurements of craziness that are needed to brew the perfect creative director. Also, take a moment and be in awe of the brilliance that is Ross Drakes.

EBH

Rebranding and naming of “Elgin Brown and Hamer,” a ship repair company that services South Africa

Cerebra

Cerebra, a logo that designs itself

YAL Sex

Young Africa Live Sex Survey: design and animation of statistics from their annual survey

” As designers and communicators, we have the ability to reach millions of people with new ideas. Organisations like CreativeMorningsIDEO, and TED, are great examples of this. Creativity is not a side line process, it can add real value to the world and to business.” – Ross Drakes

Trainaic

Trainiac company values presentation

Retroviral

Retroviral rebrand

“There is no one who knows what is going on. Everyone is just running around pretending to be adults.” – Ross Drakes

If you would like to know a little more about what is going on when it comes to your brand, click here:

great brands are communicated, not designed

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Presentation Design Masterclass: The end, for now

Hello there! Welcome to the 9th (and final) module of our presentation design masterclass. To see what we’ve covered so far, you can click through to our shiny new consolidated homepage.

This module is a look back on all the key takeaways from the masterclass so far – a good one to bookmark! (Wink wink, nudge nudge). When you’re done reading the post take a look at our most exciting free offer so far – a presentation design consultation with the Nicework team. Enjoy!

Are you ready? Let’s begin.

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Every slide must further your big idea

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We said it at the beginning, and we’ll say it again – if there’s a slide in your deck that doesn’t directly drive you toward your big idea, it has no business being in your presentation. A presentation is a story, and your audience is relying on you’ their narrator, to take them through it in a concise manner with purpose and direction. You want them to come out of your presentation with a very specific conclusion, and the only way they’re going to get there is if you lead them there.

As you move forward into structuring your slide deck and notes, think long and hard about every single thing you want to include, and whether each piece of content drives your big idea home in some way. Less is more!

Context and audience is paramount

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The more you try to address in your presentation, the more you dilute its impact. If you’re presenting to a diverse audience, pick the people who are most crucial to your goal, and speak to them. The hardest part of the preparation process is accepting that you can’t please everyone

Who are these people?

Your audience is incredibly important when it comes to your presentation as they determine your tone, execution and overall delivery. An important beginning step to delivering a powerful, engaging presentation is to define your audience – who are they and what do they need? This insight can help us determine the required level of detail and visual tone.

How informed are they about your subject matter?

This is a factor that will greatly influence the subject matter of your presentation. If your audience already has some context on your content, you can avoid a lot of unnecessary explanation and focus on selling your big idea. If they’re coming in cold and have no clue chat you’re talking about, we may need to dedicate more time (and slides!) to unpack your content.

Are they inside or outside your organization?

This can make a huge difference in your presentation. If you are presenting to an audience within your organization, they will probably be familiar with all kinds of jargon that you may use on a daily basis without a second thought – a helpful piece of information to know!

This can also define the entire tone of your presentation and the types of imagery you want to include, depending on your company, this is where you can have fun and potentially take a much more friendly approach.

What kind of tone and imagery will they likely respond to?

Imagery is a great way to bring your presentation to life. It supplies visual cues that guide the audience on a journey throughout the presentation. However, different kinds of people are likely to respond differently to different kinds of imagery? Are they very literal-minded, or will they understand and appreciate more conceptual images? Will they prefer very colourful slides, or something more somber and refined?

Why your visuals matter

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The combination of your font selection, colour application, and use of images will speak volumes about the tone of your presentation and the personality of your brand.

Each font has its own set of visual personality traits, which can add to or detract from the narrative of your presentation. When selecting fonts, ask yourself : will this add value to your narrative? Even to the untrained eye, fonts have personalities that should be used in an informed, considered way that works with your brand character and story.

When making your colour selections, also keep in mind the meanings and emotional connotations of each colour you consider. The psychology of colour may seem a little “frilly” and irrelevant in the business world, but the emotive power of colour really can have a meaningful impact on the success of your presentation. All colours have inherent meanings, which can directly impact the way your brand, in this case your presentation, will be perceived by your audience.

An audience’s reaction to colour can seem subjective, due to factors like personal preference and current mood. However, there are still common emotional associations that can be exploited to add value to your message.

When it comes to presentations, imagery can forge a greater understanding of a complex topic, and bring clarity to even the most elaborate story. People also respond to imagery on an emotional level and connect more strongly to visual cues than they do to text. Consequently, images create a more memorable and impactful experience for your audience.

The bottom line – nothing in the design of your slides should be done “just because”. All these design elements can be used to great effect to drive your content home. It would be a great pity to waste them on window dressing with no meaning behind it.

Why you still want to work with an agency

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Although we have given you all the necessary tools to create a great presentation, it still takes a lot of time to craft it into something beautiful. If your presentation is due first thing Monday morning and you still have a huge pile of work waiting on your desk for you, your presentation might fall by the wayside and end up looking rushed. It’s times that these that you need to call in help from a design agency. Given a certain time frame, they will know exactly what they need to do to in order to make sure you deliver a well-crafted presentation in time for your meeting.

Sometimes, the people who are closest to a project are the most ill-equipped to create the all-important presentation. Why? Because being in love with a project means you can’t see for yourself which information is dispensable. We get it – you want your audience to know how hard you’ve worked! That said, an impartial (creative) observer could be just the help you need to distill our deck down for minimum waffle and maximum impact. Get your agency/a designer who can take a step away from the brand to work on it. They will have an unbiased perspective of the project and may come to a solution much quicker than you could.

Regardless of time crunches and content assistance, sometimes the thing holding you back from next level presentations is as simple as technical knowhow. PowerPoint is truly some great software when it comes to creating a presentation, but more often than not, designers work on other software such as the Adobe suite to generate what can’t be done in PowerPoint.

PowerPoint is easy to use and gives you all the basics for the simple relaying of information. But what about those fancy infographics and pretty icons? Those are often made in alternative software, and are a great asset to have if you’re wanting to stand out.


 

Whether you’re comfortable creating killer presentations on your own, or are happy to admit you need a little help on the big stuff from time to time, we hope you’ve found this class useful. We’ll see you at the next one!


Have the last few weeks of hints and tips been helpful for you? Would you like to delve deeper into how to make your presentations great? Book a free consultation with our team, for in-depth insight and advice.


That’s all, folks! If you’ve enjoyed the class and would like to share it, or even just bookmark it for future use, head to our handy homepage, where we’ve filed everything neatly in one place. If you’d like to find out more about the people behind the masterclass, head over to our website.

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Presentation Design Masterclass: Briefing your agency

Hello! This is the eighth module of the Nicework Presentation Design Masterclass – the second-last one! Here are the things we’ve discussed so far: presentation planning, document setup, fonts, colour palettes, imagery, charts and graphs, and animation.

Today, we’ll be talking about how to brief an agency on creating a presentation for you. “What?” you ask, “Is this some kind of a scam? Why did you  spend all this time teaching me how to design my own presentations if you’re going to tell me to take them to an agency anyway?” If you’re confused, read on.

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When/why to go to an agency

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When you don’t have time

Although we have given you all the necessary tools to create a great presentation, it still takes a lot of time to craft it into something beautiful. If your presentation is due first thing Monday morning and you still have a huge pile of work waiting on your desk for you, your presentation might fall by the wayside and end up looking rushed. It’s times that these that you need to call in help from a design agency. Given a certain time frame, they will know exactly what they need to do to in order to make sure you deliver a well-crafted presentation in time for your meeting.

When you are too close to the project

Often if one is too close to the project/brand, it becomes difficult to streamline content and pick out the most important information, because EVERYTHING seems important. You might overthink the presentation, or get stuck on crafting one slide, rather than maintaining a steady flow. This level of dedication can be a positive thing, but it does become an issue when you need to get things done quickly.

If you anticipate this, get your agency/a designer who can take a step away from the brand to work on it. They will have an unbiased perspective of the project and may come to a solution much quicker than you could.

When you need more than the basics

PowerPoint is truly some great software when it comes to creating a presentation. However, more often than not, designers work on other software such as the Adobe suite to generate what can’t be done in PowerPoint.

PowerPoint is easy to use and gives you all the basics for the simple relaying of information. But what about those fancy infographics and pretty icons? Those are often made in alternative software, and are a great asset to have if you’re wanting to stand out.

Your big idea

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We need to know what you are trying to achieve

When it comes to marketing you product/service/company, you need to have a unique concept, ‘a big idea’, that sets you apart from the rest. What is that one thing you want your audience to take away from your presentation? In our first Masterclass, ‘Before you begin’ we have spoken about the ‘big idea’ and how to develop it. Even during crunch time, it’s still essential to set aside a little time to nail down your objects. Help us help you!

Your audience

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Who are these people?

Your audience is incredibly important when it comes to your presentation as they determine your tone, execution and overall delivery. An important beginning step to delivering a powerful, engaging presentation is to define your audience – who are they and what do they need? This insight can help us determine the required level of detail and visual tone.

How informed are they about your subject matter?

This is a factor that will greatly influence the subject matter of your presentation. If your audience already has some context on your content, you can avoid a lot of unnecessary explanation and focus on selling your big idea. If they’re coming in cold and have no clue chat you’re talking about, we may need to dedicate more time (and slides!) to unpack your content.

Are they inside or outside your organization?

This can make a huge difference in your presentation. If you are presenting to an audience within your organization, they will probably be familiar with all kinds of jargon that you may use on a daily basis without a second thought – a helpful piece of information to know!

This can also define the entire tone of your presentation and the types of imagery you want to include, depending on your company, this is where you can have fun and potentially take a much more friendly approach.

What kind of tone and imagery will they likely respond to?

Imagery is a great way to bring your presentation to life. It supplies visual cues that guide the audience on a journey throughout the presentation. However, different kinds of people are likely to respond differently to different kinds of imagery? Are they very literal-minded, or will they understand and appreciate more conceptual images? Will they prefer very colourful slides, or something more somber and refined?

Your brand

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What existing CI elements/imagery must be considered?

If you are creating a branded presentation for your company, you should ideally have an existing powerpoint template. If not, your brand guideline will give you a set of rules of what design elements you need to use throughout your presentation and the correct ways of using them. This includes the logo, colour palettes, existing imagery/style of imagery, fonts etc. Any information you can supply to your agency with regard to these things is much appreciated.

What is your brand’s personality?

Are you a quirky brand that likes to push the boundaries and take risks? Or are you a brand that likes to maintain a more professional voice? These things will affect not only the design of your slides, but also your script. If your brand was a person, who would it be?

How should this presentation inform your organization’s goals?

This goes back to the big idea behind your presentation. What is the goal? Make sure everything in your presentation ties back to what you are telling the audience so that your big idea is reinforced throughout your presentation. We need to know what you want to achieve and how you’re going to measure it, so we can be on your team and get you where you need to go.


Got a presentation that needs a designer’s magic touch? We’ve compiled these tips into a free worksheet to make your handover as seamless as possible.



Have you been enjoying the Presentation Design Masterclass? The bad news is, we’re only one instalment away from the end. Luckily for you, early next week we’ll be summing up everything that we’ve covered so far, and giving you our key tips and takeaways. We’ll also have one last, very special, free resource for you. See you then!

 

 

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Presentation Design Masterclass: Animation

Hello! Welcome to the seventh module of the Nicework Presentation Design Masterclass. First, we discussed presentation planning and document setup. Then, we tackled the basic building blocks of your design – font choices and colour palettes. Last week, covered how to enhance your narrative using imagery and graphs. Did you get all that?

Today’s post is about the power of animation in presentation design, and how to use it selectively for maximum impact. Are you ready? Let’s go.

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When animation is (and isn’t) necessary

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Contemplating using animation effects in your presentation? Playing around with PowerPoint animations can be a lot of fun, but its important not to get too carried away with them. Just like all the previously discussed topics, animation effects also need to be implemented with a specific goal in mind. Adding motion is more than just a quirky add-on, and when used correctly you can unlock a valuable tool to aid the flow of your presentation.

Animation is for emphasis/impact

Any animated element will immediately attract the attention of your audience, which is why its considered as an effective way to emphasize key ideas and present them in an impactful way. However, your desire to add animation should never take precedence over the more basic emphasizing tools you have at your disposal (ie. size, placement, contrast and colour).

Animation should enhance understanding of the narrative

When it comes to systematic and chronological ideas, animation really helps to add rhythm and flow to your narrative. Adding motion allows you to introduce elements in sequence, where you can break your information into bite-size pieces to help the audience understand how it all comes together to form the bigger picture.

Animation should be used very selectively

There is a thin line between good and ineffective animation. Animated elements can easily end up stealing the show, so make sure they are flawlessly timed and rehearsed before you put them under the spotlight. When adding animation, always opt for subtle applications, rather than relentlessly fast and domineering motions which just end up drawing attention away from your message. Flips, twists, tornados and other gimmicky animations rarely ever add value to any presentation – so try and avoid them.

Animation should be appropriate to the audience and brand

Allow the tone of your brand and the rest of the presentation to dictate the rhythm and pace of your animations. Classic and informative presentations can only accommodate a few subtle animated elements before it becomes distracting, whereas an uplifting and dynamic narrative leaves much more room for play. Just don’t let any animation overstay its welcome.

A practical example

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Animation effects are most effective when applied to key slides that don’t have too much content. Add some extra dimension to introduction slides to start off your topic with a bang. Not only do these slides provide you more freedom with regards to space, but they also give you the opportunity to grab your audience’s attention before you fire away with the rest of your message.

PowerPoint makes it easy to animate different elements in succession, which makes it a powerful tool to explain or unpack information that forms part of a bigger picture of process. Breaking down your information into steps and introducing them in sequence also allows you to communicate processes much more efficiently and without the need of much explanation.

Facts and figures are ideal candidates for animation. Consider animating key statements or statistics if you want to add more emphasis to it. Arrows and other directional elements often work well with animation, seeing that they already imply a sense of motion – so there’s no harm in driving the point home.

Avoid animation overload by using too many effects all at once on one slide. Overloading a slide with multiple effects tend to do your presentation more harm than good. Not only do they distract the viewer but also they hardly add context or value in the long run. Also try to avoid spins, drops, boomerang and other excessive effects.


Want to see these principles in action? We’ve put together a sample deck for you to poke around with. Just make sure you’ve installed our font pack, so the slides can look their best!



Have you been enjoying the masterclass? We’re in the home stretch. In the next instalment coming out later this week, we’ll be looking into how to tell when it’s time to bring in outside design help and how to collaborate best with your agency. Exciting! We’ll see you then.

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Presentation Design Masterclass: Charts & Graphs

Hi there! Welcome to module 6 of Nicework’s Presentation Design Masterclass. So far, we’ve covered presentation planning, document setup, fontscolours, and imagery. What a mouthful! Today, we’re looking at charts and graphs – how they can be used to further your big idea, and when to leave them behind. Make sure you read to the end of the post – we’ve also got a free downloadable set of sample slides for you to play around with.

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When to use (or NOT use) infographics

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Think first, graph later

When confronted with a presentation that needs to relay large amounts of information, it can be easy to fall into the trap of using charts and graphs EVERYWHERE. This is especially tempting for presentations where content comes from multiple different sources, and graphs are already supplied by third parties.

However, graphs are intended to streamline the delivery of information and highlight key points – so overusing them can easily negate their value.

The best way to approach a mountain of facts and figures is to first and foremost engage with it, process it and refine it. What is the purpose of the graph on that slide? Can it be split up? Does all the information need to be there, or can you cover some of the data verbally to reduce slide clutter? People often remember important information better when it’s packaged in the form of a good metaphor, or a well told story.

Rules of thumb

If making use of a graph or table helps to make the information more accessible and digestible, then go for it! If it captures a whole lot of information in a simple and effective way, jump right in! Just don’t resort to charts and graphs just because you can. It’s worth remembering that data, facts and figures can often seem clinical and detached – so treat them sensitively and add try to add some context or embellishment whenever possible.

  • Don’t lose sight of your goal. If a graph doesn’t substantiate, explain or otherwise further your big idea, it’s probably unnecessary.
  • Have a good lead in and conclusion for each set of data displayed, so that your audience is aware of the relevance of the data. This doesn’t have to be explained in text – you can deliver it verbally, too. Just don’t have a slide that’s essentially, “here’s a graph!”
  • Try your best to keep it simple. Spare your audience the effort of having to decipher slides that look like they’ve been pulled from an annual stock market report.
  • Don’t cram multiple complex graphs onto one slide. They should be used for emphasis – squeezing in too many of them totally defeats the point.
  • Keep your chart layouts and graph treatments consistent with the design of the rest of your slides.

Creating infographics in PowerPoint

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What chart layout to use:

When choosing an appropriate graph layout it is important to remember that different graph styles are used for different information sets.

Columns, bars and lines are good for comparing data, while area and pie charts unpack various elements within one unit.

Let the information/data dictate what layout would be the most suitable for the job.

Avoid unnecessary labels

PowerPoint’s formatting menu provides a comprehensive breakdown of all the editable chart elements. It’s worth considering which elements you do or don’t need – for instance, does your graph need a title if you are stating it verbally? Do your units have to be marked off in multiples of ten, or will hundreds do? If there is so much information that the important stuff is too small and cramped to read, scale back. Be brutal!

Try to avoid most of the clutter that comes from excessive labeling, by only adding the most essential elements. Also remember that you can always elaborate and explain the detailed information in your script and talk everyone through the data laid out in front of them. You can also sidestep the confines of graphic layouts all together by using a designer’s favourite data tool – big numbers. If you can get away with it, using just one key takeaway can be far more impactful than a huge, detailed table.

Add some context

Incorporating imagery and graphic icons provides a great platform to you to step away from dry facts and figures towards a more emotive message. Using photography as a visual cue and can be a great starting point to help pull your audience in, and help them to better understand your big idea. You can tell great stories by effectively combining data and imagery.

Make it beautiful

We know this is what you’re all here for.

PowerPoint’s default settings for graphs involve a lot of shadows, decorative gradients and other fairly pointless design touches that serve only to clutter up your slides and make your presentation look “PowerPointy”. It’s a quick enough fix, though – when you create a graph, go right ahead and remove all the unnecessary fluff. That’s gradients, shadows, lines around your shapes; all of it. You can easily go back in later and add those sorts of touches IF you feel that they are necessary for your brand or for the representation of your data.

With regard to colour schemes, there’s good news – if you’ve gone through our colour palettes module, you’re all set! Graphs pull colours straight from the themes you set up in PowerPoint – so as long as you set up your palettes correctly, everything should be right on point.

As for your fonts, the only big thing to note is that you should remain consistent. Sometimes, when graphs are created, PowerPoint likes to generate the legends and headings in default fonts, so your only task here is to go through and check that all your fonts are correct. Easy peasy!


If you’d like to do some fiddling in PowerPoint to practise these principles a little, take a look at the free sample slides we’ve set up for you!



Have you found the last few modules useful? Early next, we’ll be talking about animation – how do you pull it off in PowerPoint without getting too cheesy? We’ll show you the ropes.

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Presentation Design Masterclass: Using Images

Hello there! Welcome to the 5th module of Nicework’s Presentation Design Masterclass. So far, we’ve covered presentation planning, document setup, fonts and colours. Today, we’re looking at images – how they can be used to enhance your narrative, and how to go about selecting the right ones. Stick around until the end of the post – we’ve also got a free downloadable pack of beautiful presentation-ready images to get you started.

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When it comes to presentations, images are often left for last. However, when planning your narrative and direction, it’s good to keep in mind that some concepts are best expressed with an image, graphic or video.

Imagery should be selected to expand and connect to the your big idea, so choosing images that are applicable and relevant is very important. Don’t overdo it, though – you do not need an image on every slide just for the sake of having one. Rather focus on what would best drive your point across in the simplest and most complete manner possible.

Why your imagery is vital

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Imagery can forge a greater understanding of a complex topic, and bring clarity to even the most elaborate story. People also respond to imagery on an emotional level and connect more strongly to visual cues than they do to text. Consequently, images create a more memorable and impactful experience for your audience.

What resolution is and why it matters

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Choosing the right image dependent not only on finding something with the right subject matter, but by making sure you choose an image with the right practical specifications. Even the most beautiful of images, when scaled up to large, will distort and “break” leaving you with an unprofessional looking presentation.

The best way to ensure that the images you source are top quality images to to look at their resolution, file size and clarity.

Resolution

The amount of pixels per inch in an image. The higher the resolution, the less “blocky” the image is, allowing for crisper visual quality.

File Size

The size in megabytes on your computer, which usually gives you a clear understanding of the quality of the image and whether or not it will be a good fit. There are exceptions, but most of the time if an image’s file size is one megabyte or more, it’s big enough for your presentation.

Clarity

Not something that is measured by the computer, but rather something you can tell by eye. Are the lines clear, or has the image pixelated or blurred?

Bad-Clarity

Good-Clarity

For presentations and other media, its ALWAYS better to have larger resolution images as it allows you to crop the image differently and gives you the ability to use the image across other platforms or in future.

If you would like to print that presentation as well as using it digitally, then it’s very important that you select high resolution images. If you start with top quality images then you’ll ensure that you are safe for the future should the need to print.

Alternatives to stock images

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One of the biggest problems with stock photo websites and stock images in general, is that they are often cliché and not very emotive, often displaying the most literal interpretation of a concept. This means that stock images often lack the the necessary emotive appeal that should captivate your audience.

Finding more natural-looking imagery can be tricky if you don’t know where to look, which is why we’ve compiled a lovely little list of emotive (and free) stock image sites for you use to use when building your presentation.

Keep in mind, of course, that the best images are ones that are unique to your company, people and product. That will be what makes your presentation unique, so investing in a photographer every so often to come in and capture your products, people and locations can give you a wealth of imagery for years to come.

Collecting images and building an archive throughout the year also ensures that you are less stressed when it comes to building presentations with tight deadlines.

PicJumbo

One of my personal favourites, PicJumbo provides one quality free photo every day. Totally free photos for commercial and personal use. Subscribe to get the new ones sent to you weekly.

Death to the Stock Photo

Death to the Stock Photo requires you to sign up (free) – then you’ll have high quality photos sent directly to your email every month.  They offer some incredible images.

New Old Stock

New Old Stock, created by Cole Townsend, publishes vintage photos from the Public Archives that are free of known copyright restrictions.

Pixabay

Pixabay has an almost overwhelming number of images – browse through the Editor’s Choice  section to find the ones that stand out from the rest.


To get your library started, we’ve put together a pack of 35 beautiful all-purpose images, 100% royalty-free. You’re welcome! Just hit the gigantic yellow button below. You can’t miss it.


Have you been enjoying this course? In our next module later this week, we’ll be talking about charts and graphs – when they’re needed, the practical side of creating them in PowerPoint, and how to get them looking beautiful. See you then!

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